Parkinson’s Weekly Update

Weekly Newsletter

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May 19, 2019 – Parkinson’s Weekly Update

Weekly Update – Highlights include: On-line Parkinson’s Exercise programs; another clinical trial treatment can’t beat the placebo; feral pigs vs. placebo; dancing with your dog; Parkinson’s choruses sing for their supper; What I Wish I Knew, But Am Glad I Didn’t Know (When I Was Diagnosed With Parkinson’s); and more

This is a round-up of Parkinson’s Disease news and information that caught our attention last week.

On-line PD Exercise Programs – PD On The Move

Alexander Tressor is a broadway dancer and ballet instructor who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2007. He founded PDOnTheMove.com to share the exercise programs and lifestyle changes that have worked for him fight back against Parkinson’s. If you’re looking for ideas to improve or extend your home exercise routine, his website is a fantastic resource with hours of suggested workouts and a free library of individual exercises.

More: https://pdonthemove.com/

Gifted with a fantastic sense of humor, he also spends time as a motivational speaker for Parkinson’s groups. His 2012 video “Shaken, Not Stirred” is a YouTube Parkinson’s classic…light-hearted, entertaining and educational:

 

On-line PD Exercise Programs – Daily Dose PD

Speaking of exercise, a local TV station in Seattle reports on Nate Coomer’s online exercise program for Parkinson’s Disease, the Daily Dose PD: https://komonews.com/news/healthworks/parkinsons-patients-find-power-thru-exercise

Earlier this year, Nate Coomer, founder of The Parkinson’s Fitness Project, launched The Daily Dose: an exercise program designed to benefit those with Parkinson’s Disease that can be done from the comfort of their own home, while still providing the benefit of community and guidance by a certified physical therapist. https://www.dailydosepd.com

Blog of the Week

Allison Smith, better known as The Perky Parkie, shares an insightful and entertaining look at the “on” side of “off and on” periods with PD. Admittedly, I’ve never felt the urge to dance with my dog when I’m “on”, but they both seem to be having a good time. It made me laugh…

https://www.perkyparkie.com/2019/05/what-it-feels-like-to-be-on/

Absentee Ballot Rejected Over Parkinson’s Signature Issues

In Indiana, your ballot can be rejected and you would never know it, according to a new federal lawsuit. The suit is challenging the constitutionality of an Indiana law that allows election officials to discard absentee ballots if they don’t think the signature on the envelope matches other signatures on file with the county. The lawsuit is filed on behalf of government accountability group Common Cause Indiana and four voters in St. Joseph County whose ballots were not counted because of questions about their signature. One of these voters, 69-year-old Mary J. Frederick, has Parkinson’s disease. “Because of her Parkinson’s, her signature becomes increasingly illegible as the day goes on, although her signature has never been questioned by her bank or anyone else,” the lawsuit says. https://eu.indystar.com/story/news/politics/2019/05/16/indiana-common-cause-absentee-ballot-lawsuit-votes-thrown-out-illegally/3691931002/

Singing For Your Supper

Singing, as a therapy for Parkinson’s, continues to garner attention as a therapy for Parkinson’s Disease. Benefits of this therapy include maintaining a louder volume when speaking (a challenge for many people with Parkinson’s) and increased respiratory strength. An article from the Worcester (Massachusetts) Telegram tells the story of a Parkinson’s chorus, and highlights it’s benefits in facilitating socialization, particularly for those with more advanced PD.

When an 81 year old woman who has dealt with Parkinson’s Disease for 25 years says “The chorus is the most important thing in my life,” you get a better idea of how these programs can make a difference:
https://www.telegram.com/news/20190512/singers-in-parkinsons-chorus-find-inspiration-and-meaning

On the subject of singing, a research study in Australia attempts to measure the benefits of a particular singing therapy program for people with PD: https://parkinsonsnewstoday.com/2019/05/17/singing-therapy-may-prevent-communication-impairment-parkinsons-patients/

Another Clinical Trial Disappoints (Placebos Win Again)

Atlas Obscura tells the fascinating history of “The Livestock Living at the End of the World”, feral pigs that roam The Auckland Islands, a subantarctic archipelago now considered part of New Zealand: https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/what-lives-on-auckland-islands

Why are we interested in these pigs?

On the mainland of New Zealand, Living Cell Technologies (LCT) keeps a small herd of Auckland Island pigs in a secured, high-tech quarantine facility, where each one—according to Willis—is worth close to $450,000.

“Due to 200 years of isolation after they were left on the island, the Auckland Island pigs are free from viruses [and] pathogens which affect most other pigs,” says LCT CEO, Ken Taylor. While widespread pig-borne viruses have been a major obstacle in xenotransplantation, or grafting cells from animals for use in human therapies, the Auckland Island pigs haven’t been exposed to them.

Using cells sourced from the virus-free Auckland Island pigs, LCT is testing an experimental therapy for Parkinson’s Disease called NTCELL. Support cells, which secrete cerebrospinal fluid and support the natural function of the nervous system, are taken from a sedated pig’s choroid plexus and inserted in capsule form into a damaged site of the human brain. According to Taylor, the therapy is currently undergoing Phase IIb trials.

Sadly, LCT announced this week that this phase IIb trial met safety goals but not efficacy  goals. The company is “seeking advice from both our statistician and a panel of internationally recognized experts on clinical studies in Parkinson’s disease to help interpret the data further.” Of particular interest in  the press release was a curious statement referencing “6 placebo patients … in whom responses were quite varied.”
http://www.lctglobal.com/upload/news/2019/190513%20Phase%20IIb%20trial%202%20year%20results.pdf

Placebos, Again

Researchers hate the placebo effect. Millions of dollars are wasted in failed critical trials when promising drug candidates or treatments fail to perform better than fake placebo treatments.

If you missed it last week, or didn’t have time to watch a 20 minute long video, we think you’ll find our theories on Parkinson’s placebos quite interesting.

We look at this issue from a different perspective. Why are placebos more of a factor when it comes to Parkinson’s? (Spoiler alert: We think it’s dopamine.) Can we leverage what we learn about placebos to create our own placebo effects? (Spoiler alert: You’re probably already doing this to some extent.)

Maybe it’s a vitamin & supplement regimen, or your diet. Maybe there are foods you will or will not eat at particular times of the day. Maybe it’s your art or music. Maybe it’s your exercise routine. Maybe it’s your bicycle. Maybe it’s swimming. Maybe it’s dancing. Maybe it’s meditation. Maybe it’s neurofeedback. Maybe it’s yoga or tai chi. Maybe it’s a sport. Maybe it’s table tennis. Maybe it’s poetry. Maybe it’s your gun therapy. Maybe it’s a red light bucket on your head. Maybe it’s volunteer work.

Placebos aren’t just in research studies, they are all around us. Understanding how and why they affect us, and how dopamine is involved, gives us additional insight into Parkinson’s Disease.

https://parkinson.fit/placebo/

Blame It On The Dopamine

Speaking of dopamine (the neurotransmitter that we just can’t get enough of), a recent study looks at dopamine’s role in forming new memories. Could this be why your long term memory is rock solid, but you can’t remember what you ate for breakfast?

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/researchers-come-up-with-simple-game-to-improve-memory

What I Wish I Knew, But Am Glad I Didn’t Know (When I Was Diagnosed With Parkinson’s)

This title sounds like something Yogi Berra might have said. Like baseball, Parkinson’s Disease is 90% mental and the other half is physical. (I think that’s actually quite a profound analysis of life with PD.)

What I wish I knew when I was first diagnosed with Parkinson’s is that a lot of people continue to lead long active lives with Parkinson’s Disease for 10 to 20 years, and even longer, and some actually lead more active and more productive lives post-diagnosis.

John Cleese once said, “Life is a terminal disease, and it is sexually transmitted.” Parkinson’s by contrast, is neither. https://parkinson.fit/forums/topic/what-i-wish-i-knew-but-am-glad-i-didnt-know-when-i-was-diagnosed-with-parkinsons/

Parkinson’s Exercise Programs in the News:

Cape Girardeau, Missouri (Christian Boxing Academy) – https://www.kfvs12.com/2019/05/14/fighting-parkinsons-ringside-view-patients-taking-back-their-lives/

Lake Norman, North Carolina (Rock Steady Boxing) – https://www.wbtv.com/2019/05/13/boxing-gym-helps-people-with-parkinsons-disease-fight-get-stronger/

 

Previous Week – May 11, 2019

May 11, 2019 – Parkinson’s Weekly Update

Weekly Update – Highlights include: Mayo Clinic researchers explore the relationship between low levels of Vitamin B-12 and Parkinson’s; appendix removal might or might not affect Parkinson’s risk; monkey butt research finds PD related proteins linked to inflammation; impulse control disorders and PD; Pharmaceutical News from the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology; technology targets freezing of gait; creating your own placebo effect; inspiring people with Parkinson’s talk boxing, DBS and poetry; and more.

This is a round-up of Parkinson’s Disease news and information that caught our attention last week.

Highlights include: Mayo Clinic researchers explore the relationship between low levels of Vitamin B-12 and Parkinson’s; appendix removal might or might not affect Parkinson’s risk; monkey butt research finds PD related proteins linked to inflammation; impulse control disorders and PD; Pharmaceutical News from the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology; technology targets freezing of gait; creating your own placebo effect; inspiring people with Parkinson’s talk boxing, DBS and poetry; and more.

Mayo Clinic published a research commentary that analyzes the relationship between low levels of Vitamin B-12 and Parkinson’s Disease. While the paper does not prove causality, it does “propose that vitamin B12 supplementation could be considered as an adjuvant approach to improve cholinergic transmission and, potentially, motor and cognitive function in patients with PD.” And it makes a case for “future clinical trials of high-dose vitamin B12 supplementation as a well-tolerated symptomatic adjunctive therapy for posture and gait instability and cognitive impairment in PD.” Read more:
https://parkinson.fit/forums/topic/mayo-clinic-report-on-low-vitamin-b-12-and-parkinsons-disease/

The story that generated the most headlines last week was a review study that concluded that people who have had their appendix removed were 3 times more likely to develop Parkinson’s Disease. While that sounds worrying, it basically meant that the odds of developing PD jumped from 0.3% to 1%…significant, but not what I’d call a smoking gun…especially when just a few months ago, a European study found the opposite. Yawn…boring. But if you must read about it, this Fox Foundation article has info about these conflicting stories:
https://www.michaeljfox.org/foundation/news-detail.php?the-appendix-what-the-link-to-parkinson

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin Madison were playing a game of “smell my finger” with a group of monkeys when they realized something. (I’m told that’s not exactly how it happened.) They were able to detect chemical alterations (phosphorylated alpha-synuclein) similar to abnormal protein deposits in the brains of Parkinson’s patients in the intestines linings of monkeys with inflamed bowels. This is interesting because it adds support to the idea that inflammation may play a key role in the development of PD. Longer term, if this was found to correlate as a PD biomarker in humans, PD detection could be offered in conjunction with a regular colonoscopy.
More details: https://neurosciencenews.com/parkinsons-monkey-gut-inflammation-13066/

That last story reminds me of when my kids were younger and they were fond of asking me “You know what?” When I’d dutifully reply “What?” They would enthusiastically reply back “Monkey Butt!” To think that somewhere in Wisconsin, a similar dialog exchange may have inspired that research study. In which case, I’m going to propose that a follow-up study should evaluate a promising drug candidate that can not only treat inflamed monkey bottoms, but just might cure Parkinson’s: Anti Monkey Butt Powder.

Impulse control disorders (ICDs) are a frequent side effect of dopamine agonist medications that are sometimes used to treat Parkinson’s Disease, in some cases leading to serious financial, legal and/or devastating  psychosocial consequences. An article from Argentinean neurologists provides a great overview of ICDs, allowing you to become more aware of what to look out for. ICDs  involve pleasurable behaviors performed repetitively, excessively, and compulsively, with a failure to resist an impulse or temptation to control an act or specific behavior, which is ultimately harmful to oneself or others and interferes in major areas of life. The major symptoms of ICDs include pathological gambling, hypersexualtiy, compulsive buying/shopping and binge eating. The spectrum of ICDs also includes punding, hobbyism, walkabout, hoarding, and compulsive medication use.
More: https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.00351

The Micheal J. Fox Foundation issued an update to their Parkinson’s Diet Guide. While there is no one specific diet for Parkinson’s, what you eat and when can affect your medications and symptoms. The updated guide explores these topics as well as research on popular regimens (such as the ketogenic and Mediterranean diets) and Parkinson’s: http://www.michaeljfox.org/foundation/news-detail.php?updated-guide-diet-and-parkinson

Pharmaceutical News from the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology

The 71st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology was held in Philadelphia last week. This is a big event for drug companies to draw attention to the latest pharmaceutical studies. There were no major new advances in Parkinson’s Disease treatment, but there were a few updates of interest.

The DUOGLOBE study is a 3-year evaluation of the real-world effectiveness of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (DUOdopa/duopa) on motor fluctuations and duration and severity of dyskinesia in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (51% study participants ≥10 years’ disease duration). An interim analysis of first year results reported significantly reduced patient-reported OFF time (mean decrease of 4.1 hours), and significantly reduced dyskinesia. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/912601

Last December (2018), the FDA approved a levodopa inhalation powder (Inbrija from Acorda Therapeutics) for intermittent treatment of OFF episodes in people with Parkinson disease treated with carbidopa/levodopa. Results were shared from an extension study of the original SPAN-PD study, showing that this levodopa inhalation powder is effective in achieving an ON state during OFF periods, as well as in gaining more dyskinesia-free ON time and lowering the daily amount of OFF time.
https://www.neurologyadvisor.com/conference-highlights/aan-2019-conference/inhaled-levodopa-effectively-maintains-on-state-in-parkinson-disease/

San Diego-based Neurocrine Biosciences presented data from two Phase III clinical trials of opicapone, a once-daily, oral catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor for Parkinson’s disease. They found that patients receiving opicapone 50 mg with levodopa had a significant and sustained improvement in symptoms. The studies (BIPARK-1 and BIPARK-2) found that the combination of the drugs had a significant and sustained increase in ON time without problematic dyskinesia in Parkinson’s patients who had motor fluctuations. Opicapone is already approved in Europe since June 2016 as Ongentys by BIAL. In February 2018, Neurocrine licensed opicapone for development and commercialization in the U.S. and Canada from BIAL.
https://www.biospace.com/article/neurocrine-s-opicapone-plus-levodopa-improves-parkinson-s-symptoms/

After more than a decade of studies, the three year phase 3 clinical trial of isradipine study is complete. The study of the blood pressure drug isradipine did not show any benefit for people with Parkinson’s disease. The drug isradipine had shown promise in small, early studies and hopes were high that this could be the first drug to slow the progression of the disease. “Unfortunately, the people who were taking isradipine did not have any difference in their Parkinson’s symptoms over the three years of the study compared to the people who took a placebo,” said study author Tanya Simuni, MD, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.
https://parkinson.fit/forums/topic/isradipine-phase-3-study-results-expected-soon/#post-115567

The open-label EASE LID 2 study concludes that long-term use of amantadine (specifically the extended release formulation Gocovri from Adamas Pharmaceuticals) in conjunction with levodopa treatment may help patients optimize their levodopa regimen. In layman’s terms, this vaguely worded endorsement is due to results showing minor motor improvements in UPRDS scores after amantadine is added to an existing carbidopa/levodopa treatment plan.
https://www.neurologyadvisor.com/conference-highlights/aan-2019-conference/amantadine-may-optimize-levodopa-regimen-in-parkinson-disease-treatment/

PD Technology Spotlight

A Cal Poly (California Polytechnic State University) student project to help a local military veteran has become a business designed to help patients with Parkinson’s disease overcome a debilitating and dangerous symptom known as “freezing of gait.” De Oro Devices, based in San Luis Obispo, California, recently edged out six other startups for a $100,000 investment during the second annual Central Coast Angel Conference Pitch Competition held in April by the university. While working on the project as part of the Quality of Life Plus (QL+) program, which pairs the challenges of wounded vets with student projects, student Sidney Collin piggybacked on research showing that audio and visual cues can interrupt freezing of gait to re-establish the brain-body connection and restore mobility. While those features were integrated into existing devices, they couldn’t be added to a person’s cane or walker. And other devices didn’t provide on-demand cueing. “It was either always on or always off, and that was a problem for a lot of people,” Collin said. The device, called the Gaitway, is slightly bigger than a computer mouse and easily attaches to a cane or walker. When a patient gets stuck, he or she can activate an audio cue (a metronome beeping noise) or a visual one (a green laser line that projects on the ground), which will interrupt the freezing of gait.
https://parkinson.fit/forums/topic/device-provides-on-demand-cues-to-recover-from-freezing-of-gait/

Chinese technology company Tencent, in collaboration with UK medical start-up Medopad, has launched a clinical trial in London that aims to use artificial intelligence to diagnose people living with Parkinson’s.  40 participants will use an artificial intelligence powered mobile app to track and monitor their symptoms. The app will ask users to participate in a number of online tests, such as performing hand movements in front of their phone’s camera, that will help doctors gather information on the development of their condition.
https://parkinsonslife.eu/parkinsons-ai-trial-launched-chinese-tech-giant/

Researchers from Osaka University (Japan) have developed an automated tool that uses ultrasonication to quickly measure α-synuclein aggregates, potentially enabling early diagnosis and assessment of new treatments for Parkinson’s disease. The HANdai Amyloid Burst Inducer (HANABI) device uses a burst of ultrasonication to detect α-synuclein aggregation in cerebrospinal fluid. Ultrasonication induces pressure variations, transforming sound waves into mechanical energy. The authors expect the HANABI device to be used for to clinical diagnosis, severity assessment, and treatment development for Parkinson’s disease.
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/ou-nar050719.php

Placebo Effect & Dopamine – Theories & Application

From the first time I read about it, I’ve been fascinated by the placebo effect. The placebo effect is a big challenge in clinical trials for a new drug or treatment. In these so-called double blind studies, there is one group of patients that receives the treatment and another group that receives a fake treatment known as the placebo. The patients, and those evaluating the patients do not know who is receiving the real treatment or the placebo until the end of the study. For a treatment to be deemed effective, the patients who received the treatment need to fare better than the placebo group in a statistically significant way. In other words, the treatment being tested has to prove that it’s better than nothing…a challenge that is surprisingly difficult to meet.

A big part of the problem in trials related to Parkinson’s Disease is that there are significant numbers of individuals that see improvement during these tests as part of the placebo group. This has fascinated me. I’ve wanted to understand this better, so that I can create my own placebo effect.

I created a presentation video to explain why dopamine’s significance in Parkinson’s Disease invites the placebo effect and offer some suggestions how people with Parkinson’s can leverage this to create placebo effects.

More: https://parkinson.fit/placebo/

 

Inspiring People with Parkinson’s

Parkinson’s Life profiled Jennifer Parkinson, who was diagnosed with young onset Parkinson’s Disease 14 years ago at the age of 32. After 4 years of worsening symptoms, she discovered boxing, and testifies “Boxing changed my way of life and gave my kids their mum back.” Jennifer now runs a non-profit boxing and fitness organization helping people with Neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s, MS, Stroke, and Traumatic Brain Injury.
https://parkinsonslife.eu/theres-a-stigma-that-if-you-dont-look-sick-then-there-is-nothing-wrong/

David Sangster was diagnosed with young onset Parkinson’s Disease 8 years ago at the age of 29, and has been extremely active as an advocate for Parkinson’s issues in the UK. Worsening motor symptoms and Dyskinesia led him to consider Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). In a recent video, he shares his excitement about regaining control of his Parkinson’s symptoms:

Poetry is not normally my thing, but Wayne A. Gilbert’s “PD Refusenik” is an entertaining and introspective protest of a conscientious objector being asked to battle Parkinson’s. Wayne is, among other things, a lover, not a fighter. He is also a retired teacher and professor of English and of Educational Psychology. He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2005 and has been writing about his experiences living with it ever since. Thanks to the Davis Phinney Foundation for sharing Wayne’s video.

Parkinson’s Exercise Programs in the News

Previous Week – May 4, 2019

Parkinson’s Disease: Placebo Effect & Dopamine

Researchers hate the placebo effect, but for many of us with Parkinson’s, placebos help get us through the day.

Maybe it’s a vitamin & supplement regimen, or your diet. Maybe there are foods you will or will not eat at particular times of the day. Maybe it’s your art or music. Maybe it’s your exercise routine. Maybe it’s your bicycle. Maybe it’s swimming. Maybe it’s dancing. Maybe it’s meditation. Maybe it’s neurofeedback. Maybe it’s yoga or tai chi. Maybe it’s a sport. Maybe it’s table tennis. Maybe it’s poetry. Maybe it’s your gun therapy. Maybe it’s a red light bucket on your head. Maybe it’s volunteer work. Maybe it’s trainspotting, planespotting, cranespotting, drainspotting or brainspotting. (I didn’t even know that was a thing!) Maybe it’s social media. Maybe it’s anti-social media. Maybe you’re a smart ass, and you think a serious research effort exploring inflamed monkey bowels is a reason to talk about Anti Monkey Butt Powder. (Sorry, but sarcasm and snark are part of my Parkinson’s therapy, so don’t question my placebo, it seems to be working.)

But seriously, placebos and the placebo effect are a fascinating phenomenon that is particularly relevant to Parkinson’s Disease. Placebos aren’t just in research studies, they are all around us. And personally, I think that understanding how and why they affect us gives us the opportunity to create our own placebo effects.

From the first time I read about it, I’ve been fascinated by the placebo effect. The placebo effect is a big challenge in clinical trials for a new drug or treatment. In these so-called double blind studies, there is one group of patients that receives the treatment and another group that receives a fake treatment known as the placebo. The patients, and those evaluating the patients do not know who is receiving the real treatment or the placebo until the end of the study. For a treatment to be deemed effective, the patients who received the treatment need to fare better than the placebo group in a statistically significant way. In other words, the treatment being tested has to prove that it’s better than nothing…a challenge that is surprisingly difficult to meet.

A big part of the problem in trials related to Parkinson’s Disease is that there are significant numbers of individuals that see improvement during these tests as part of the placebo group. This has fascinated me. I’ve wanted to understand this better, so that I can create my own placebo effect.

I created a presentation video to explain why dopamine’s significance in Parkinson’s Disease invites the placebo effect and offer some suggestions how people with Parkinson’s can leverage this to create placebo effects.

Read More

Balance Exercises for Parkinson’s

(Author’s Note: Oops, I pressed the button to publish this article and video compilation before it was complete. Please consider it a work in progress.)

Balance Training is not a Parkinson’s specific issue, it is an issue for everyone as they age.

Selecting the appropriate balance exercises will depend on how good your balance currently is. There are many factors that affect balance, and it can be argued that all leg strengthening and core strengthening and flexibility exercises are, in a way, balance exercises.

I’ve highlighted a few videos that provide ideas to consider when selecting balance exercises. If you watch the videos, you’ll notice the final video seems out of place. That is because I have a theory that many Parkinson’s balance issues are related to turning difficulties. Improving neck flexibility (the first video) and adding resistance to trunk/ab twists (the last video) are two exercises that help improve turning deficiencies.
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